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anton dee lake district

It’s easy to pine for that next trip abroad, to just put your feet up and do nothing for a few days. In reality we all know that never happens. You get restless, bored and impatient, feelings you were literally trying to get away from. Funny enough it’s not the location that spoils the fun but your own mind. Next time you feel the itch to get away from it all and spontaneously book a trip somewhere warm, research something that’s around the corner. For my latest photography journal thats exactly what I did so read on about my latest adventure:

PART 1 // PART 2

Bolton Abbey

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Bolton Abbey is an estate in Wharfedale in North Yorkshire, England, which takes its name from the ruins of the 12th-century Augustinian monastery (now known as Bolton Priory). Nestled in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales on the banks of the River Wharfe, Bolton Abbey provides a down to earth day out. If you’re a fan of history, nature and long walks then this is a place for you.

Bolton Abbey is the “jewel in the crown” of Yorkshire’s many landscapes, and the 30,000 acres of beautiful countryside boast over 80 miles of footpaths to walk and explore. I was going through a creative ‘mental block’ of sorts so my visit here was ideal of getting out of my own head and letting the fresh air inspire me with new ideas.

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Bolton Priory is one of the most beautiful of English Religious Houses, founded by the Charter of Alice de Romilly at Embsay in 1135 and moved to Bolton in 1154. It was a priory of Augustinian Friars who were known as Black Cannons. It was a monastic life and they lived under a rule observing the three substantial vows of poverty, obedience and chastity.

The nave of the abbey church was in use as a parish church from about 1170 onwards, and survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Building work was still going on at the abbey when the Dissolution of the Monasteries resulted in the termination of the priory in January 1540. The east end remains in ruins. A tower, begun in 1520, was left half-standing, and its base was later given a bell-turret and converted into an entrance porch. Most of the remaining church is in the Gothic style of architecture. It is still a working priory today, holding services on Sundays and religious holidays. (SOURCE)

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bolton abbey sheep under tree

Lake District

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Instead of taking a gap year in Asia remember that you probably haven’t explored most of your own country yet. While doing research for this post I came across some old photos from a trek I did with some friends around the Lake District. The cost of food and petrol were minuscule if you consider how much a holiday abroad actually costs you in terms of time and money.

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Historically split between Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, the Lake District is now entirely in Cumbria. All the land in England higher than 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea level lies within the National Park, including Scafell Pike, the highest mountain in England. It also contains the deepest and longest bodies of water in England, respectively Wastwater and Windermere.

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Ensure you prepare thoroughly for the trip ahead as the climb can become treacherous with the constantly changing weather. A map, rainproof coat, water and sturdy shoes should be the first things you pack. Cameras and iPhones can come later. It will all be worth it once you take in your surroundings. My old pictures above barely do it justice.

anton dee lake district

Malham Cove

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Malham Cove is a limestone formation north of the village of Malham, North Yorkshire. The large, curved feature was formed by a waterfall carrying meltwater from glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age more than 12,000 years ago. Today it is a well-known beauty spot within the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

A large limestone pavement above the cove awaits if you brave the walk but the entire area is gorgeous in its own right. The cove itself is very popular with climbers because of its number of climbing routes (many of which can be ascended in the rain). So the next time you’re short on things to do make sure to explore your local area to the fullest, the Taj Mahal can wait.

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STYLEGRAM

Thanks for reading my latest article. Give it a share using the links below so others can enjoy it too. For more check out my latest lookbook from Paris, street style from London Collections or my trip to the magical city of Coimbra.

brimham rocksAs always stay classy and if you have a story you wish to share please contact [email protected] or tag your social posts with #DVSN

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